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RobertT
20-02-10, 21:36
Hi

I have seen support wires on some single seaters to support front aerofoils etc

They look to have loops swaged onto the ends to attach them to wing and body/nosecone.

Anyone know where I can get these?

Thanks

Rob

Duggy
20-02-10, 21:53
Boat yards usually have the parts and tools to make them up

redturner37
20-02-10, 22:36
You can also get them from camping shops. You could of course D.I.Y, buy the cable you require, get some small bore copper pipe or the correct ferrules and swage it up in the vice. If you make a small jig to squeeze it in, you can make an extremely neat job.

redturner37
20-02-10, 22:42
Robert, you have PM.

Fireblade
21-02-10, 00:31
Bowden cable with crimp ferrules available from various rigging suppliers. Used for safety ties on lighting rig lanterns, cameras and anything else flown. Available in various sizes.
Old thermocouple outer makes a good light crimp tube

The small stuff is good for meter seals. Allegedly :D

jolibre
21-02-10, 02:32
Another easy way is to use a strip connector,slide the connector over the cable,loop to the required size,feed the end of the cable back through the connector and tighten the screws,easy to adjust if need be

Fireblade
21-02-10, 03:30
Yes seen that one used around the paddock many a time, jolibre

RobertT
21-02-10, 10:04
thanks for suggestions all - is a strip connector a thing with a couple of U bolts?

Devon Chard
21-02-10, 10:35
Could be one of these. (http://www.avenuesupplies.co.uk/index.php?id=563&pid=2249&sid=1)

redturner37
21-02-10, 10:58
thanks for suggestions all - is a strip connector a thing with a couple of U bolts? 'U' bolts do work and are probably as strong as the wire itself, but look very untidy on a racing car. Our local B & Q have the correct size of wire and 'U' bolts in stock...

jolibre
21-02-10, 11:08
Could be one of these. (http://www.avenuesupplies.co.uk/index.php?id=563&pid=2249&sid=1)

Yep theyre the one,makes a tidy job and the plastic covering can be removed if you wanted to ,quick and easy and easily adjusted if the cable stretches,also cheap

dennis.doyle
21-02-10, 11:29
1.33 is my kind of money - think I may give it a try to stop rear wing wobble.

BTW, Are you sure 30 amps is the appropriate resistance?

Devon Chard
21-02-10, 11:36
1.33 is my kind of money - think I may give it a try to stop rear wing wobble.

BTW, Are you sure 30 amps is the appropriate resistance?

watt!!!!!! :D

redturner37
21-02-10, 12:05
1.33 is my kind of money - think I may give it a try to stop rear wing wobble.

BTW, Are you sure 30 amps is the appropriate resistance? Dennis, if you are going to use wire to stop things moving about on your car, it's going to cost a lot more than 1.33. I was thinking Humber Bridge quantities......

dennis.doyle
21-02-10, 12:25
Being serious for a second (while I try & think of something funny to say about the resistance):

I would have thought wire could provide a useful amount of sideways stiffness. Although the wing is mounted off a couple of ” ally plates from the gearbox, which are plenty enough for the downforce, you can deflect it measurably sideways by hand. BTW This is a bog std., ally Van Diemen wing & mounting, rather than the bog-paper variety.

Fireblade
21-02-10, 12:28
BTW, Are you sure 30 amps is the appropriate resistance?

???? Interesting unit of resistance.
Best take you back to the 'ohm'

dennis.doyle
21-02-10, 12:35
Fair cop, but since we all know that electricity is a form of magic, surely there is no point in trying to understand it?

Hasta
21-02-10, 12:57
???? Interesting unit of resistance.
Best take you back to the 'ohm'

I believe it may be an impedence in his understanding of electrical terms . Or possibly a reluctance on his part I think you should perform some form of inductance course for him .

:D


Hasta

dennis.doyle
21-02-10, 13:03
I'm not sure I have the capacitance to withstand this degree of insulation about me.

iranoff
21-02-10, 13:23
Resistance is the best protection.

Craig Powers
21-02-10, 13:29
Yep theyre the one,makes a tidy job and the plastic covering can be removed if you wanted to ,quick and easy and easily adjusted if the cable stretches,also cheap

I tried to use a screw electrical terminal as a cable clamp but with little success. It kept slipping. In my case it was on a throttle cable. Admittedly I wasn't trying to make a loop in the cable.

For making loops on my wing support cables I used small bore copper pipe, nipped up in a vice, as already suggested. Cable tension was adjusted by very small turn-buckles, which were available at the time from B&Q. You can get them from boating shops.

SteveSlowboy
21-02-10, 22:01
I've even seen standard blue electrical crimp rings used with wire - mind you, that was to support a floor rather than a wing so not sure if they would be up to the job for that!

Fireblade
21-02-10, 22:49
The Bowden type crimps mentioned previously are for items that have a strain or weight rating. Plastic insulated electrical crimps are soft plated copper and are not designed for any large degree of mechanical strength.

Hasta
22-02-10, 09:55
Resistance is the best protection.

Have to correct you there.

it's futile

Hasta

iranoff
22-02-10, 10:41
Our Electrical Engineering Manager assures me that I am right. ;)

EMac
22-02-10, 11:45
Have to correct you there.

it's futile

Hasta

No, no - resistance is useless. You're all forgetting your Douglas Adams.

Hasta
22-02-10, 12:21
No, no - resistance is useless. You're all forgetting your Douglas Adams.

Doctor Who - 1976 The deadly Assassin - The Master


and in Star Trek it s the Borgs catch phrase



Hasta

Rescue Dude
22-02-10, 13:34
and in Star Trek it s the Borgs catch phrase



Hasta

I thought that was "Where's me washboard" ;)

RaceMag
24-02-10, 10:20
I don't suppose anyone has suggested plastic coated stainless fishing trace? It attaches to itself by bending around in a loop and then twisting together and heating with a lighter. Will retain 90% of breaking strain and is available locally up to 300lb load. It is very thin