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  #1  
Old 10-12-17, 13:51
chevman47 chevman47 is offline
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Sintered clutch.

Is there a more conventional clutch that will bolt straight on to a flywheel that used a sintered clutch. 184mm presently used. I fancy something with a smoother action and easier to drive. Only using 150 BHP max. Advice welcomed. Thanks.
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Old 10-12-17, 16:41
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I think the 7.25" clutch for the 'small' flywheel will be happy with either organic or sintered centre plate - I've used both. That will be the clutch size you are stuck with to fit a twink in a single seater.

Using the conventional Hewland Mk8/9 side shaft from the slave cylinder to the cross shaft, the clutch operation is pretty 'in and out' and really nasty. Having served my apprenticeship on Austin 7s it was like coming home. I'm advised that the civilised solution is a concentric hydraulic cylinder acting directly on the bobbin/clutch, although for me that was more cost/more inaccessible parts to go wrong.
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Old 10-12-17, 18:47
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I made the change in the opposite direction on an xflow once. This was from a lightened iron flywheel, std. GT clutch & plate to a steel flywheel, some AP clutch & sintered plate from Burtons. An important difference was I needed a lengthened thrust bearing in order to be able to de-clutch at all. I do not know if this was because of different thickness/offset of flywheel or dimensions of clutch or plate.

I think I was told that the sintered plate needed a steel flywheel. I have no idea whether organic clutches prefer steel or iron.

I didn’t much like the sintered clutch - just one more problem in ensuring downchanges were smooth enough not to upset the car when thinking about more pressing issues such as braking points & apexes

BTW, 184mm is only 6 thou less than 7.25”.
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Last edited by dennis.doyle; 10-12-17 at 19:08. Reason: brain fade
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Old 13-12-17, 00:46
stevieturbo stevieturbo is offline
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Typically "scintered" clutches are used to allow very thin discs...this doesnt usually lend itself to organic linings.

Is it actually a scintered plate setup you have, or just a paddle style with riveted friction material ? The latter should be a lot easier to move to an organic type lining.

Really at only 150hp, as long as the clutch has good clamping force, organic should be easy.

Have you contacted any clutch places to see if they could line your existing friction plate with a normal material ? Superclutch was mentioned recently, although that business may have changed hands ?

Or TTV do that sort of thing now

http://ttvracing.com/clutches/

Metallic type clutches can be used on iron or steel, obviously iron will wear faster.

Whilst many modern metallic type clutches can be very good to drive with, full face being easier than a low number of paddles....when you go back to organic, the difference really is night and day !
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Old 13-12-17, 17:35
chevman47 chevman47 is offline
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Thanks Stevie, Mine is actually using the 105 Thou metallic plates. But, as you probably know, this set-up requires a stepped flywheel and a limited diameter size. I have all the bits, but would prefer to run organic, without changing the flywheel, (small 104 tooth diameter). With my twin plate set up on the shelf, I don,t really feel like spending around £450 on a whim. I think all the paddle and organic types are a larger diameter?
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Old 13-12-17, 19:49
stevieturbo stevieturbo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chevman47 View Post
Thanks Stevie, Mine is actually using the 105 Thou metallic plates. But, as you probably know, this set-up requires a stepped flywheel and a limited diameter size. I have all the bits, but would prefer to run organic, without changing the flywheel, (small 104 tooth diameter). With my twin plate set up on the shelf, I don,t really feel like spending around £450 on a whim. I think all the paddle and organic types are a larger diameter?
There is no reason a clutch company couldnt make you any size you wanted. The main limitation would be disc thickness for an organic type, which is easy to get very thin by bonding/scintering metal...but maybe not so easy with organic. But I'm sure it is possible.

Yes typically larger diameter would be organic...but that doesnt mean it cannot be applied to small diameter. It's probably just common applications you see. Clutches these days are made from all sorts, and lots of various designs
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Old 15-12-17, 14:43
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clutch drive plate

Quote:
Originally Posted by chevman47 View Post
Is there a more conventional clutch that will bolt straight on to a flywheel that used a sintered clutch. 184mm presently used. I fancy something with a smoother action and easier to drive. Only using 150 BHP max. Advice welcomed. Thanks.
Hi Chevman.
I use a single 184mm dia, Helix 4 paddle sprung cerametallic disk (Pt No: Drive Plate 56-2001) on my Caterham (240bhp+). The springs provide a much less harsh release for very acceptable road use but allow a rapid dump on the hillclimb start line. Hope this helps.
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Old 15-12-17, 17:45
chevman47 chevman47 is offline
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Thanks Mad Prof, Certainly given me food for thought. I do not know whether these would be compatable with the AP diaphragm though. Is your paddle plate only about 105 thou thick or 7.5mm? I cannot find that part number listed in Demon Tweeks catalogue to glean info.
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Old 15-12-17, 17:59
Hillman Hillman is offline
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Just had a look at the Helix website. The 56-1000 (3 paddle) & 56-2000 (4 paddle) series paddles require the use of a Helix cover plate.
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Old 15-12-17, 21:50
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Have a quick look at this thread on UR from 2 years ago:

http://www.uphillracers.com/showthread.php?t=11318
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